Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII)

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    Title VII, the federal law that prohibits most workplace harassment and discrimination, covers all private employers, state and local governments, and educational institutions that employ 15 or more individuals. In addition to prohibiting discrimination against individuals because of race, color, national origin, religion, and sex, those...

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    In July 2015, the EEOC ruled that a complaint alleging discrimination based on sexual orientation in violation of Title VII is within the EEOC’s jurisdiction (Baldwin v. Foxx, Appeal No. 0120133080 (7/15/15)). The EEOC noted that Title VII prohibits employers from relying on sex-based considerations when taking employment action and...

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    Sexual orientation isn't a protected class under current federal law. State and federal laws—including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII)—prohibit discrimination in employment decisions such as hiring and firing based on race, religion, color, sex, and national origin.  EEOC rulings In 2012, the EEOC ruled...

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    Retaliation includes any adverse action taken against an employee for filing a complaint, supporting another employee’s complaint, or engagin in other protected actvity under a variety of laws. The most common type of retaliation claim involves an employee who alleges that she was first harassed or discriminated against and later punished...

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    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) prohibits employers from discriminating against someone because of his religion when making decisions about hiring, firing, or other terms and conditions of employment. Title VII also prohibits employers from harassing employees because of their religious beliefs. It’s broader than...

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    When Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) was originally passed, it prohibited employment discrimination based on religion, but didn't define the term “religion." Language was added later stipulating that “the term ‘religion’ includes all aspects of religious observance and practice, as well as belief....

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    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) prohibits discrimination, harassment, and retaliation based on an employee's religion. The U.S. Supreme Court has defined "religious belief" as a belief that is both "religious" in the employee's own scheme of things and sincerely held by the employee. Thus, the law's protection extends...

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    In 1963, Congress passed the Equal Pay Act (EPA) as an amendment to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to “prohibit discrimination on account of sex in the payment of wages by employers.” In general, the EPA applies to most employees for work done for most employers, although there are certain exceptions. The Act prohibits pay...

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    HR professionals are all too familiar with the McDonnell-Douglas burden-shifting standard for establishing discrimination from circumstantial evidence. Under the standard, an employee presents a prima facie (minimally sufficient) case that he belongs to a protected class and suffered an adverse action. The employer then presents a legitimate...
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    Shortly after becoming pregnant, an employee receives an unwanted transfer to another location. After an extended FMLA leave due to complications with her pregnancy, she is fired. Sounds like an open- and-shut case of discrimination or retaliation, right? Not necessarily. Although the timing was suspicious, courts will always look at the...
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