Religious Harassment

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    When an employee is harassed because of his religious beliefs, it usually takes one of two forms: hostility or proselytizing. With either scenario, an employer must determine whether the employee is being harassed because of his “sincerely held religious belief.” The question isn't whether the employee’s religion is...

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    On December 17, 2013, the Charles County Board of Education agreed to pay $225,000 to settle a former employee's claim that the board transferred her, demoted her, and left her no choice but to quit after she complained about being groped and sexually harassed by her boss. Stephanie Rosa was an assistant in the school system's food service...
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    In Wisconsin, December not only brings snow for cross-country skiers, snowshoers, and snowmobilers, but it also brings religious holidays and employers' obligation to accommodate employees' religious beliefs and practices. Employees request time off to attend religious observances, wear religious clothing and jewelry, and set up holiday displays...
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    The 3rd Circuit recently adopted a six-factor test to determine whether a shareholder-director of a company could be considered an "employee" (and thus able to institute a lawsuit) under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Facts Robert Mariotti was a longtime shareholder-director of his family's business, Mariotti Building Products....
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    In some circumstances, the first inquiry into whether someone's employment rights were violated is whether he's an employee. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit (whose rulings apply to all Pennsylvania employers) recently ruled that a shareholder-director of a closely held family corporation was not an "employee" under Title VII of the...
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    Freedom to believe and practice your own religion is a strongly held American value as well as a right recognized by the Idaho Human Rights Commission (IHRC) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the organizations charged with receiving and investigating claims of religious discrimination (and reverse religious discrimination) in...
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    As all HR professionals know, there's little you can do to prevent an angry employee from filing a lawsuit. What you can do is be in the best position to defend against a claim if it happens. As a recent case decided by Delaware's federal district court shows us, the employer did everything it should have to address and remedy alleged...
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    With Easter approaching and the steady flow of news putting religious issues in the spotlight, it's a good time to review the requirements regarding religion in the workplace. Religion and private employers Although the U.S. Constitution prohibits governments from interfering with the free exercise of religion, it doesn't...
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    Although courts sometimes render decisions that make little or no sense to the average person, creative lawyering isn't always enough to convince the court to rule in your favor. In a recent decision involving alleged religious discrimination, the Fourth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals (which includes West Virginia) made short work...
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    Religious practices and diversity are increasing in the United States, and that trend is presenting new challenges for employers. One common form of religious expression that affects the workplace involves employees' requests for accommodations to observe their religious holidays. Title VII prohibits religious...
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