Nevada News & Analysis

  • Supreme Court will decide whether LGBT discrimination is unlawful

    The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide the long-unresolved question of whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects employees from discrimination based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. The issue has been percolating in the lower courts for quite a while. As it frequently does, the Court declined to consider the question until there was a conflict between several appellate courts. Let's take a look at the history of the Court's decisions, the arguments on both sides of the issue, and what we can expect next.

  • September 30 deadline looms for newly required EEO-1 data

    Employers required to submit EEO-1 reports to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) are venturing into uncharted territory as they work to collect newly required information due by September 30. While they may be accustomed to submitting traditional EEO-1 information—data on employees' race/ethnicity and gender, or what's being called Component 1 data—this year they also must compile data on compensation and hours worked, or what's being called Component 2 data.

  • Why your company needs an antibullying policy

    Bullying in the workplace is a common occurrence that's often ignored or overlooked by management. Sometimes it may be ignored because, unlike sexual harassment, there's usually no legal requirement that an organization have an antibullying policy. It also may be overlooked because leaders take a hands-off approach, believing employees should work out their own issues. It may sometimes be ignored because more than 70 percent of bullies in the workplace are the bosses, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute.

  • Workplace Trends

    Research finds lack of mentorship and coaching. New data from media agency network Mindshare U.S. found that 42% of U.S. employees said their companies either don't offer mentorship programs or don't offer enough of them. Men were more likely than women to say they either got enough or more than enough mentorship programs at work, at 57% versus 42%. The research also found that 66% of U.S. employees rank ongoing feedback or coaching on their work as an important or very important benefit in the workplace. Yet 28% of people surveyed said that they either don't get enough ongoing coaching or feedback or that their companies don't even offer it. The data showed that women were more likely than men to feel that way, at 31% versus 25%.

  • 9th Circuit: School can't shield teacher's firing behind ministerial exception

    In a recent decision, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals (whose rulings apply to all Nevada employers) addressed the "ministerial exception" to employment laws, which permits religious organizations to discharge their ministers for reasons that otherwise would be illegal. Let's look at the case.

  • Tips to ensure you are prepared for a deposition

    For an HR professional, giving a deposition is a lot like visiting the dentist. You know it's necessary, but you probably aren't looking forward to it. You may be asked questions you don't want to answer (like how often you actually floss). And finally, consistently responsible practices should reduce your stress levels about the event, make it go a lot smoother, and prevent worse problems in the future.

  • Feeling stressed? Take it outside

    We all need a breath of fresh air sometimes. With summer starting up, we should be able to find plenty of ways to get away from our desks ― even just for a break. And Alaska's natural beauty can be a perfect cure for employees' work-related stress. This article addresses the unwanted consequences of work stress and the benefits of encouraging employees to spend time outside.

  • What to do when U.S. DOL comes knocking at your door

    The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) performs wage and hour audits of employers by selecting them at random, or because they are in targeted industries (usually low-wage), or as a result of a complaint from an employee or former employee. The investigations have increased significantly over the past few years and can result in orders for back wages and penalties. What steps should you take when the DOL comes knocking (generally with no prior notice)? Read on and you'll learn!

  • Trust—cornerstone for high performance culture

    A CEO for a privately held telecommunications company just learned the results of a recent corporate culture survey. Only 40% of her employees responded favorably in the category of "Employee Engagement." She was disappointed and frustrated, recognizing the impact of high employee engagement on achieving operational excellence. The initiatives that she implemented within the past year to boost commitment had failed. She didn't know what to do next.

  • Agency Action

    NLRB chair claims joint-employment comment review not outsourced. Responding to concerns from congressional Democrats, National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Chair John F. Ring says his agency is not outsourcing the review of public comments on the joint-employer standard. In March, Ring wrote a letter to Bobby Scott, chair of the House Committee on Education and Labor, and Frederica S. Wilson, chair of the House Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor & Pensions, saying the Board has not outsourced the substantive review of comments on its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on what constitutes joint employment. Instead, he said the NLRB decided "to engage temporary support on a limited, short-term basis to perform the initial sorting and coding of the public comments." He said the process ensures confidentiality protections are in place, and the Board's professionals will perform the first substantive review of the comments.