Georgia News & Analysis

  • Exit interviews—some do's and don'ts

    Why? That's usually the first question that comes to mind for managers and employees alike when news gets around the office that an employee has resigned. (Unless, of course, the resignation catches everyone by complete surprise and they first ask, "What?!") While you may never understand all the reasons an employee decides to move on, you can learn a great deal if you make proper use of an exit interview.

  • Supreme Court will decide whether LGBT discrimination is unlawful

    The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide the long-unresolved question of whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects employees from discrimination based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. The issue has been percolating in the lower courts for quite a while. As it frequently does, the Court declined to consider the question until there was a conflict between several appellate courts. Let's take a look at the history of the Court's decisions, the arguments on both sides of the issue, and what we can expect next.

  • September 30 deadline looms for newly required EEO-1 data

    Employers required to submit EEO-1 reports to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) are venturing into uncharted territory as they work to collect newly required information due by September 30. While they may be accustomed to submitting traditional EEO-1 information—data on employees' race/ethnicity and gender, or what's being called Component 1 data—this year they also must compile data on compensation and hours worked, or what's being called Component 2 data.

  • Why your company needs an antibullying policy

    Bullying in the workplace is a common occurrence that's often ignored or overlooked by management. Sometimes it may be ignored because, unlike sexual harassment, there's usually no legal requirement that an organization have an antibullying policy. It also may be overlooked because leaders take a hands-off approach, believing employees should work out their own issues. It may sometimes be ignored because more than 70 percent of bullies in the workplace are the bosses, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute.

  • Behind the times: Is rounding employees' time outdated?

    Time clocks have long been an accepted method for tracking how much time an employee puts in. Many time clocks track time in tenths of an hour or quarter hours. However, time clocks are being replaced by more sophisticated time-tracking systems, such as electronic and computer time trackers, which are better equipped to track the exact number of minutes an employee is on the job. Nevertheless, employers continue to wonder whether they should round an employee's time and whether rounding time worked is legal. This article discusses some of the best practices for rounding if you are going to do it.

  • Workplace Trends

    Research finds lack of mentorship and coaching. New data from media agency network Mindshare U.S. found that 42% of U.S. employees said their companies either don't offer mentorship programs or don't offer enough of them. Men were more likely than women to say they either got enough or more than enough mentorship programs at work, at 57% versus 42%. The research also found that 66% of U.S. employees rank ongoing feedback or coaching on their work as an important or very important benefit in the workplace. Yet 28% of people surveyed said that they either don't get enough ongoing coaching or feedback or that their companies don't even offer it. The data showed that women were more likely than men to feel that way, at 31% versus 25%.

  • DOL says FMLA leave mandatory for employees and employers

    After more than 25 years, you might think questions regarding proper interpretation of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) would be settled. It's a highly regulated law, and it provides employers far more detail and clarity than they get with most other labor and employment laws.

  • Tips to ensure you are prepared for a deposition

    For an HR professional, giving a deposition is a lot like visiting the dentist. You know it's necessary, but you probably aren't looking forward to it. You may be asked questions you don't want to answer (like how often you actually floss). And finally, consistently responsible practices should reduce your stress levels about the event, make it go a lot smoother, and prevent worse problems in the future.

  • Why employee engagement must be a priority, not an option

    When it comes to your workplace, do you know how many members of your team are truly engaged? On average, U.S. companies have an engagement level of 32%. Basically, one out of three of your team members is engaged. Studies suggest that disengaged employees cost the U.S. economy between $400 billion and $600 billion a year!

  • Tips on responding to EEOC predetermination letters

    After weeks, or sometimes months, of silence from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) about a discrimination charge that was filed against your company, you may receive a letter stating it's likely the agency will determine that the law was violated. This "predetermination" letter will sometimes summarize the evidence supporting the allegations in the charge, but sometimes it will simply say that the evidence supports the allegations or doesn't support your stated defense. The letter usually gives you about 10 days to respond or provide further information to be considered. Should you bother responding when it sounds like the investigator's mind is made up? Absolutely!